Protecting Black Hair

Black hair is caught-up in American political controversy and public discourse. A search on protection of black hair returns a bunch of articles related to politics and law.

Wash, dry, comb, oil, and braid is more of what comes to mind when I think about protecting my own hair.

Today, black hair has to be protected by other means. Those means being state, federal, and constitutional. Why does black hair matter anyways? It’s not bothering anybody it just wants to be left alone. Hence the reference in Solanges song, “Don’t touch my hair.” The song highlights the frustration black women experience when attempting to protect their hair. Actress Gabrielle Union discusses the hair traumas blacks experience with their hair in her book and also on the famed series America’s Got Talent.

Leaving it alone is exactly what I did in 2019. The outcome of this was surprisingly good. In late November of 2018 after bleaching my hair it was severely damaged from heat and other chemicals. In 2019, I did the big chop once again. During the course of the year I experimented with protective styles such as hair weave and extensions. This was a frustrating process. I had to consider what employers would think about my hair from time to time and whether or not it would be well received.

My hair grew about 5 inches this year alone. Black hair is delicate it has to be protected by eating the right food, rest, water, and exercise.

Laws protecting black protective hairstyles is essential to the existence of humanity. Giving Black women the freedom to choose how to wear their hair has rippling effects on society as a whole.

Protecting black hair is the epitome of inclusion and diversity. It highlights racial/ethnic/gender -neutrality and equality. It demonstrates to the public the correct way to relate to others not normally embraced on the basis of for style and physical characteristics.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.